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washington martha. she was always called patsy as lady bird johnson was never called claudia. so i was just wondering, you mentioned in his letters when he referred to her in his letter that it was just mentioned on the telephone that he did call her patsy. and i also wanted to mention that in the story that i'm reading about martha and george washington that the house, mt. vernon, was originally the home of his half brother, george washington's half brother. that he lived in a smaller farm. and i wondered if you are going to talk anything about his years as a surveyor or is this really about the years with martha as an adult? >> thank versus much. this is actually martha washington's time in the sun. so we won't talk about george's early career. what about the nickname patsy? >> patsy, pat, patty were the nicknames for martha in those days just as peg or peggy is a nickname for margaret. the martha nickname has fallen out of favor. nobody was named patricia back then. the only patsies were martha's. that was simply the common name. >> the smaller farm she's reference ing? >> smaller, it wa
economy. they are making huge investments. one of the problems in washington is due to the tea party. the tea party wants to have a sequester an across-the-board cuts. with to stop that mentality. we are investments to infrastructures -- we have to stop that mentality. we have to make investments to infrastructure. development, we have used our strack structure -- our tax structure to bring back jobs from overseas. chinese used cap structured and subsidies to encouragement and faxing. manufacturing can come back to unite states, but we have to encourage it. companies cannot move their money overseas. companies will stay here and ofufactured here because transportation cost. we're not doing that. we have to make a difference. >> that let me to where i want to go. there are those who say that it is time for america to do something to jumpstart our economic recovery. 162,000 jobs disappointed wall street. we had to do something with our tax code to reflect the need of a modern-day economy. i harken back to the days when i was a young reporter covering bill bradley who came up with the f
? we'll have analysis from raj rajaratnam of the "washington post." eric schmitt of the "new york times." and cbs news state department correspondent margaret brennan. and we'll look at another story that rocked washington, the sale of the "washington post". we'll talk about the future of newspapers with former "washington post" editor len downie. former "new york times" editor bill keller. and john harris, editor in chief of politico. there's a lot to cover, but this is "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: and good morning again, michael hayden who served as both the c.i.a. and n.s.a. director now consulted for the cherdov group here in washington, joins us as our lead guest this morning. general, the president made that news conference on friday, and he said the american people need to know more about what the national security agency is doing because there are a growing number of people in the congress who are wondering is the n.s.a. infringing on americans' right to privacy? what do you think-
speaking, turkey, saudi arabia and cutter. >> washington and london compared to -- prepared for possible strikes against serial -- serious military targets. >> let's go now to washington and our correspondent there. what is the latest you are hearing about how the talks have been going in the u.n.? >> russia and china did not back the draft resolution, condemning their use of chemical weapons by the assad regime and asking for permission to take all necessary measures to protect civilians. the draft resolution would authorize force to protect civilians from chemical weapons. it was not a big surprise, at least not for me. after a meeting in the security council, the ambassadors in france and the united kingdom came together in a meeting behind closed doors and now they are consulting with governments in paris, london and washington. i don't expect any u.n. resolution today or tomorrow. >> the british foreign secretary says talks at the u.n. need to go on for a few more days. does that mean an imminent attack is off the table? >> i don't think this is true. i think the americans and briti
gathered in washington, d.c. again. former presidents, celebrities and every day americans were there. >> near two weeks, firefighters are till fighting that fire out in california. we'll have the latest news coming up at 11:00 here on aljazeera. ♪ theme ♪ theme >> as the u.s. may be drawing closinger to intervention in syria polls vin to show a large majority of americans oppose military action. how can the u.s. build an international coalition when its leaders can't build one here at home? also, twitter, google and "the new york times" websites suffer cyber attacks. a group connected to the syrian government is the likely culprit. how vulnerable is america's cyber infra structure to another attack. >> the women who worked side by side with the men during the civil movement the were given their proper due. >> we begin with syria, and how an attack that seemed eminent may be less so now. president obama it is he hasn't yet decided to take action. while britain, france and turkey are open to military intervention, the u.n. and arab league are far from a consensus. as we report, ave
our march on washington conversation series, as a father and son reflect on what that event has young people were found with courage and some often radical symptoms, i wouldn't have the >> ifill: and we close with the story of army staff sergeant ty michael carter, who received the nation's highest military honor today for his bravery druing the war on afghanistan. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> bnsf railway. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and friends of the newshour. >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the united states insisted today it is "undeniable" that syria's rulers gassed their own people last week, just outside damascus. that was coupled with new warnings of repercussions yet to opportun
the new york time yesterday and also washington post and as you said, a lot of social media and other important media in the western world -- >> it's getting worse. the problem is that they are not even that sophisticated, i mean, in fact, we saw how -- we know that some of them are what we call -- they do not launch complex attacks, but those attacks are out there launching and working. that's my big concern now. >> we've heard for years that cyber attacks could take out power grids, financial markets, banks and officials have done drills and simulated attacks. we're going to show you one called cyber shock wave, produced by the bipartisan policy center, including a whole officials. >> the country's internet system is now slowing down to a virtual crawl. communications with financial trading houses are almost at a stand still. >> it is an active war. you turn off everybody's cell phone, you don't allow them to bank, work, communicate be this is an attack on the united states. it may not be a bomb, but it's much more significant than a bomb going off. >> scary simulation there. what s
on anniversary of the march on washington, and the legacy of martin luther king jr.. series, first ladies, influence and image. over the next couple of hours, we will visit places with history curators. away fighting the revolutionary war, martha washington ran their plantation. >> it is clear that martha arrived at mount vernon in 1859 and there was a lot of management that she had to do. when she married george washington, she brings with her to mount vernon 12 housemates. that is really almost unimaginable luxury. these are slaves that are for the most part, not field labor, not producing crops, which is where your income is coming from. they are doing things like cooking, serving at table, clean the house, doing the laundry, doing selling, this is not productive labor in the sense that it is not productive income. she brings them with her and she brings financial resources to the marriage as well as her managerial skills. it makes mount vernon a successful operation and it makes it possible for washington to be away for eight years fighting a war. the fact that he has this support sys
shocker. the washington post company sells its number and publishing assets to founder. the deal capped the day of big news in print, online and in television. >> looser lending. new reports say banks are lowering standards for businesses, consumer and home buyers. does it signal a return to the bad old days of too easy credit? >> home grown, walmart pledges to buy american made goods. how it could affect manufacturing. we kick off a special series called made in america. >> it was a stunning late day capper today to a day of major news affecting the newspapers you read, the websites you visit, the tv networks you watch, and the cable systems you may subscribe to. founder and ceo is buying the publishing business of the washington post company. which includes the fames newspaper for $250 million. the post long run by members of the eugene meyer and graham families reached the peak of its fame for tough reporting, during the watergate era. baso says, i understand the critical role the post plays in washington, d.c., and our nation, and the post's values will n
night at 9:00 p.m. eastern on c-span programs on every first lady from martha washington to ida mckinley. tonight, sarah polk, mark rhett taylor and abigail fillmore. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] sarah polk was on diplomacy and her strong suit is intelligence and political discussion. >> she made no bones about the fact she took an interest in politics. and that she was her husband's partner. >> she grew naup political household in tennessee. her father was a local politician so she grew up loving politics. she married james after he won a seat in the legislature. because she would not have married him if he had -- >> unfortunately for james k. polk he died three months after leaving the white house. and sarah began a 42-year widowhood. polk place became a shrine to her husband and she would invite anybody who wanted to to come to visit and see the objects she had collected through her long and illustrious political career. >> to live there for many years on her own. during the civil war, generals on both
driving the politics and gridlock in washington with two authors and veteran political journalists: robert draper and mark leibovich. >> you do wonder, when people are in office, when people are in power, who are they really working for? are they in it to serve the public good, or are they in it for self-service? >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> suarez: president obama took aim at the soaring cost of college today with an ambitious plan to rate schools and link tuition prices to federal financial aid. >> a higher education is the single best investment y
-span. programs on every first lady, from martha washington. tonight, elizabeth munro and catherine adams. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] ♪ >> elizabeth monroe was a true partner in her husband's career. they were a love story and absolutely devoted to each other. elizabeth monroe had a well- developed sense of style and image. this is a woman who knew how to carry herself with great elegance. >> it is called the era of good feeling. >> this is a woman who spoke french. >> very great beauty. she received is seldom anything in the white house. she hated it. >> dignity, civility. those are the words that come to mind. >> elizabeth monroe served as first lady from 1817 to 1825 as a time known as the era of good feeling. coming up, we will explore her life and what were not always happy times inside the white house for this woman born into a well-to-do new york family. she married james monroe at the age of 17 and traveled new york extensively with him. she brought with her to the white house a certain french
morning, august 15. ahead on the "washington journal ," your reaction to the latest development in egypt and what the u.s. response should be. you should join the conversation at (202) 585-3880, our line for republicans. (202) 585-3881 for democrats. we also have our line for independents at (202) 585-3882. join us on facebook, send us a tweet, or e-mail address, at somegin with a look of the headlines from outside the u.s., the "guardian" newspaper -- egypt's bloody crackdown. when the story first went to prince, the death toll was 200 78. overnight, the death toll has been updated to 421. there is this from the "miami killed asundreds egypt's forces storm the protest camps. a similar headline from "usa today," egypt the reps in chaos. -- a reps and chaos. from the "wall street journal" website -- egypt's military regime a reps setting off a day of violence that left at least 421 people dead. the government fractured and ties with its international partners in tatters. cairo streets were calm this morning following the curfew overnight with funerals for the dead. fur
were also in washington today to mark this anniversary. >> when i look out over this diverse crowd and survey the guests on this platform, i seemed to realize what otis redding is talking about, and what dr. king preached about, this moment has been a long time coming but a change has come. >> now, it is time for "the last word" with lawrence o'donnell, thank you for joining us, have a great night. >>> 50 years ago tonight, reporters filing stories on a demonstration in washington noted three things. it was peaceful, it was far larger than anyone expected. and a young preacher departed from his planned text. those unplanned sentences have never been forgotten. >> nbc news presents the march on washington. >> i have a dream. >> 50 years later, the dream lives on. >> it was in the middle of battles to break down the walls of apartheid in america. >> martin luther king jr. made a speech, but he also delivered a sermon. >> my father watched from the white house as dr. king and y thousands of others recommitted us to higher ideals. >> injustice is injustice everywhere. >> he gazed at th
on a demonstration in washington noted three things. it was peaceful, it was far larger than anyone expected. and a young preacher departed from his planned text. those unplanned sentences have never been forgotten. >> nbc news presents the march on washington. >> i have a dream. >> 50 years later, the dream lives on. >> it was in the middle of battles to break down the walls of apartheid in america. >> martin luther king jr. made a speech, but he also delivered a sermon. >> my father watched from the white house as dr. king and thousands of others recommitted us to higher ideals. >> injustice is injustice everywhere. >> he gazed at the wall of segregation and saw that the power of love could bring it down. >> martin luther king jr. did not live and die to hear his heirs whine about political grid lock. >> the arc may have bent towards justice, but it doesn't bend on its own. >> for all who are willing to take the flame for justice, i know that flame remains. the tired teacher, the businessman, they are marching. >> we knew fear. the sound of the bells today. let freedom ring everywhere we g
$250 million for "the washington post." 1% of his personal fortune. as our jim accosta reports, billionaires have gone shopping in america's newsrooms. >> watergate brought down a president. >> have to get something on paper. >> but it made a newspaper. a triumph not just for reporters, bob woodward and carl bernstein but also for the family that owned "the washington post" lead by it's publisher kathryn graham now the legacy in the future of one of the most important newspapers rest in the hands of one billionaire, amazon found jeff b bezos. gives new meaning to the term -- >> just follow the money. >> the "post" now follows other major newspapers. "the wall street journal" bought by murdoch and "the boston globe." >> i think what people are forgetting when we're talking about billionaires taking over the media, that's not exactly new. >> william randolph everyoherst how wealth -- >> i expect to lose a million dollars next year. you know, at the rate of a million dollars a year i'll have to close this place in 60 years. >> something bezos has in common. remaking the selling th
the killing of civilians, washington refuses to condemned the generals for the recent power grab barack obama interrupted his holiday to do announce the violence. cannot determine the future of egypt. that is for the up -- egyptian people. we do not take sides with any particular party or political figure. to blame is tempting the united states or the west or some other actor, for what has gone wrong. he has canceled a planned military exercise with egypt. 1.3 billion dollars in american military aid is in the pipeline but will be reviewed. despite everything, egypt is a key for u.s. goals in the middle east. support is crucial to maintaining the peace treaty with israel. washington supports egypt against militants on israel's borders in the sinai. and the u.s. navy's access to the suez canal is controlled by egypt. and trieste house hard to work with whoever is in power in cairo. was mohamedly that morsi. today it is the military. it is a policy that has left them with no friends or influences in egypt. officials are saying there is no benefit anymore from supporting the generals. >> i think
in washington but first this report from jane ferguson. >> reporter: anti-military retestprotests in egypt has cha. they replace the demonstrations. here, around a thousand people gathered around the migathered . >> translator: i'm here to say no with an open chest. i know there are murders from the army and thugs with the police at any moment but i am standing here steadfast with us. >> reporter: the protests are daily now and they are noisy. they are in honor to protest and to avoid the serious crack downs. on tuesday, the anti-coup alliance says it has a new tactic to try to maintain. >> translator: the situation in this is tense what we do in each area and also depends on the curfew. there's demonstrations. every government has its own. some you will find -- the change in protests. >> reporter: the presidential candidate, the country called terrorism. that's the way those supporting the military-led government have been referring to those opposed to them. >> translator: issue needs to be raised. will anyone accept egypt to be a victim of a terrorism. this is the issue, egypt will not accep
the march on washington, looking back and remembering both the dream and the dreamer. >> and the army doctor turned killer, a jury decides whether he lives or if he dies. >> the syrian government now calling on the u.n. to investigate chemical weapons on syrian army soldiers. syrian ambassadors gathering in new york to discuss potential military intervention there. meanwhile u.n. chemical inspectors continue their investigation into the august 21st attack i in a suburb of damascus. prime minister david cameron calling for meetings. >>> joining us now for the latest diplomat i can updates. do we now know what was on the draft resolution on the part of the british government? >> we don't. no one is leaking over this. normally there are a few leaks, but on this occasion we really don't know what is in this document. to be clear there was a meeting in the side room involving the five permanent security council. the united kingdom, the united states, france, russia, and china. there was also a meeting taking place, and i it's still going on at the u.n. involving haiti. after either of those meeti
in the 1963 march on washington remember the events of that day in a discussion hosted by the martin luther king, jr. memorial library in washington, d.c. this is an hour 30 minutes. >> when our archivist suggested that i conduct oral histories with people that attended the march, i jumped at the opportunity to hear firsthand accounts of the days that i, like many of you, had only known about in books, photos and media reflections. i was curious about literal and other journeys that people took to get to the lincoln memorial on that hot august day in 1963. we put out a call for people it into the march to be interviewed and the panelists here today were the first to answer that call. it is important to note that this is the beginning of an ongoing project and derek and our collection not only oral histories but also memorabilia and other artifacts from the march to the washingtonian the community archive. two of the panelists, peter bailey and doctor ella kelly were right under my nose as their regular attendees to the black studies lecture series that takes place in the black study center
which found the unemployment rate went up in 28 state and declined in eight states. "washington journal" is next. >> the president's plan to try to keep college more affordable is already getting some reaction from capitol hill. we might have to weigh in. some are in support and some are critical saying the new ranging system that the president put out is arbitrary. meantime college can cost up to $30,000 year on average now for some folks and the debt load students carrying can be the same amount. with that background is the cost of college worth it? that's the question for you this friday morning. republicans call 202-585-3881, democrats 202-585-3880 and independents 202-585-3882. look forward to your calls and also your participation by social media. you can send us a tweet at twitter @c-span wj. you can also send an e-mail is the cost of college worth it? allen writes, it used to be but right now it slightly losing steam. now people that are caught with a minimum of expectations while being strapped with a new burden of paying back the loan making short m
washington post" company agreed monday to sell its flagship newspaper to founder and chief executive jeffrey these those. ownership of the paper after four generations. next week at back at former "washington post" owner the late katharine graham discussing her biography, personal history. c-span: author personal history did your children learn anything from this book about you? >> guest: that's a hard question. i'm sure they probably did but i couldn't tell you exact a wife. c-span: all of the stuff in here about your early life and your husband about that, did you talk that out? >> guest: yes, i think they understand that he was ill. the oldest one was 20 and the youngest one was 11 so they had to deal with it then and always. c-span: the question i had after i read the book was why do you want us to know all of this? >> guest: i really don't suppose that i meant to tell everything to everybody but once i sat down to write my story i just tend to be frank and open and i wanted to be very truthful and i wrote it the way i saw it. i told it the best i could. c-span: when di
on an airline in honolulu and flew to washington, d.c., and lands at dulles and actually gets an audience, let's say, peter king, or dianne feinstein. how do we think he would have been received if he had a private audience? we have seen how they reacted, they spin the truth, he would have been buried and we would have never known the truth. >> i know you haven't been in direct contact with your son, but what do you know about his condition right now? >> i'll say that having spoken with his russian attorney, he said he's safe. he obviously is exhausted. but he's now needing a period of time where he can recoup his energy level and reflect on what he wishes to do going forward. that's from his attorney. we hope to meet with him very soon, with edward in the next weeks. >> good luck. thank you. >> thank you. >> thank you. >> and the chairs of the foreign affairs committee, robert menendez, democrat, and republican congressman ed royce, the chairman of the house foreign affairs committee. senator, let me begin with you, you heard this from lon snowden, and his attorney, they don't believe that ed
nbc news in washington, the world's longest-running television show, this is "meet the press." >> good sunday morning. thousands of people gathered here in washington saturday to re-create the march on washington where dr. king gave his famous "i have a dream" speech. and it was exactly 50 years ago today, august 25th, 1963, that dr. king and the executive secretary of the naacp, roy wilkins, appeared right here on "meet the press." many of you either already had the chance or will have the opportunity to see that special program as we have made it -- the original broadcast available to our nbc stations across the country. our roundtable joins us in just a moment. but first joining me now, the only living speaker from the march on washington, congressman john lewis. he spoke yesterday in front of the lincoln memorial. >> you cannot stand by. you cannot sit down. you've got to stand up, speak up, speak out, and get in the way, make some noise! >> congressman lewis, welcome back to "meet the press." >> thank you very much, david, for having me. >> what a moment. we actually have the two
of the march on washington. we'll take you there live. >>> and 184,000 acres burned. plus, 4,000 firefighters equals one of the worst wildfires in california state history. we're going to have a live report. this is "cnn newsroom." u.s. officials are all but telling u.n. inspectors to get out of syria, get out of the way. it is not and if, but when the u.s. will launch an attack. the u.n. teams are carrying on. inspectors back to evidence for the alleged chemical attack. these pictures were posted online showing inspectors talking to survivors at a medical facility near damascus. u.s. warships, they are ready, but there are warnings here at home and around the world that the united states could create inextricable mess by conducting a military strike on syria. cnn is the only u.s. network broadcasting live from inside of the country, inside syria. fred pleitgen is on the ground in damascus with the very latest. fred, essentially what is it like to be there with people thinking and believing that a strike is imminent? >> well, i have to tell you, people really do seem to be nervous here. there
material, in connection with the speech he gave on the march on washington, i had provided him with a summary of ideas and summary of language that he had previously discussed. so it wasn't as if i was providing him with some creative ideas that were solely mine. i was more like a secretary who was summarizing and putting in the form that could be used for the speech, the opening paragraphs, little did i know, until i was sitting listening to him, i was standing some 50 feet behind him, when i was listening very carefully, i said, oh, my god, i guess he decided to use those opening paragraphs. to those paragraphs, which constituted the first seven paragraphs. to those opening paragraphs, he seemlessly added his own additional paragraphs, and it was when he was speaking his own additional paragraphs that he was interrupted from the written speech that he had prepared. and he was interrupted by mahalia jackson who shouted to him, tell him about the dream, martin. tell him about the dream. most people don't know that the speech which is so frequently celebrated over the years, the
leaking from that plant. >>> and legalized pot in washington is turning into a very big business. how everyone from pot growers and sellers to the state government are reaping the rewards. >> fire officials in idaho say they have turned the dyed against the wildfire near sun valley. they cleared the way for hundreds of people in that area to return home meanwhile, across the western u.s. thousands of firefighters are working to bring 50 other wildfires under control. at this point the fires have been contained in colorado bringing the total number of states involved to ten. we have more with what they're up against. >> it's dawn, and just 37 degrees. some 240 men and women are preparing for another day on the fire line. grabbing a quick coffee and breakfast before the morning briefing. cole is the person in charge here. he's the branch director of the fire, the number one firefighting priority in the country. his job description, employ the troops, keep them safe and try to beat the fire. >> to be able to come out ahead of this. it's weakened, and we have a chance to go after it. >> s
world news america. reporting from washington, i am katty kay. as the world relate -- waits for a response to the theory and attack, forces are ready. >> we are ready to go. >> we are ready to go. order does come, what would military action look like? tonight, we assess the actions. a he had but 50 years after martin luther king delivered his famous speech, how much of it has come true? welcome to our viewers on public television in america and elsewhere around the globe. the u.s. is ready to launch a military strike against theory at a moments notice. that is what the defense secretary has told bbc news in an exclusive interview. the remarks came after suspected chemical attacks last week, and today, there was fresh fighting on the ground as the french point into the u.s. with some tough words on their own, saying they will punish those who decide to gas people. we start with our reporter who spoke to secretary chuck hagel. >> all dressed up and nowhere to go. were not able to carry out their work due to snipers, but due to which side, it is contested. was pretty c
washington, there is a march -- a reenactment about a mile east of here at the base of the capitol, that's where they will begin retracing the steps that were taken 50 years ago. we have heard from senator angus kaine, joaquin castro from san antonio, texas, and a highlight so far as been the music. two-thirds of the trio peter paul and mary sang blowing in the wind. and un ambassador, major of atlanta, he got up there and belted out some spiritual songs that were popular in the heyday of the civil rights moment. at this moment we're hearing from the widow of med -- med ger evers. and earlier we heard from melanie campbell. she had some very strong words about a topic that is on the forefront of many people's minds here today. let's listen. >> today racism and inequality does not manifest itself in a white sheet, jim crow laws, poll taxes or barking dogs, but the dogs are still biting in other ways. today there are no white sheets, but there are judges in black robes in the u.s. supreme court who struck down section 4 of the voting rights act, opening the flood gates in many states to p
know, with iraq and the attacks on the terrorist targets. it's the way washington is unfortunately. that those leaks come out. i guess it's part and parcel of the way our open government works and the nature of what happened in d.c. >> thank you, general, for joining us this morning. in our next hour we'll talk about the u.s. options in syria with the chairman of the senate foreign relations committee. senator men nen doesendez will join us. >>> a military jury needed just two hours yesterday to decide on a death sentence for major hasan, the ft. hood gunman. he admitted killing 13 people and did not defend himself at his trial. he said he acted to protect islamic fighters overseas. he will be the first american soldier to be executed in more than 50 years. >>> firefighters in california's syriaear sierra nevada are gaining ground this morning on the rim fire in yosemite national park. video shows just how big this fire is. yesterday, the flames forced park officials to close the main entrance on yosemite's east side. the fire is now 30% contained this morning.
here before. >> yeah. >> in washington, why not give the weapons inspectors the amount of time that they need? >> well, you're right. the white house and administration officials have essentially made the point moot as far as the any of the inspectors. it's interesting, because one week ago today, it was one week ago today, that is when that attack occurred outside damascus. initially after that, the president was still hesitant to engage in any military action against syria. this has been going on for two and a half years, the length of that civil war. he talked the need for a mandate and operating under the structures of international law. everyone is waiting for the intelligence report. we understand that there are meetings ongoing among the president and top advisers. the intel report is going to have to be declassified for release to the american people. there are indications that tomorrow could be the day we see that. mean time, we have gone from the president on thursday saying a u.n. mandate was necessary to yesterday, the vice president saying there is no doubt that th
is speak the truth. secondly, there is a new generation of leaders stepping forward in washington. new, young at leaders, people like rand paul and marco rubio and mike lee and kelly ayotte. [applause] you know what is incredible? five years ago, not one of them was in office. you have to go back to after world war ii to see an instance where the generation of leaders who were effectively defending free-market principles is a new generation stepping forward -- let me suggest something. if you look at that new generation, they are almost always exactly the same age. was 10 whence, i ronald reagan became president. i was 18 when ronald reagan left the white house. know how for the world war ii generation, many of them would prefer to fdr as "our president?" i will go to my grave with ronald reagan defining what it means to be present. -- president. [applause] he didn't blink. i have referred to this next generation, this new generation as the children of reagan. listen to them communicate. listen to kelly stand up and talk about free-market principles. listen to marco. listen to rent. --
perez. o'bryan.teve ♪ tot: good morning, welcome "the washington journal." we are in the waning days of a congressional recess and members of congress are gearing up for this fall's legislative agenda. a question for all of you this morning, what is your message to house and senate lawmakers as they prepare to turn to -- returned to washington next month. for republicans, 202-585-3881. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for independents, 202-585-3882. also send as a tweet, if you go to or post your comments on or e-mail us at a piece this morning from janet hauck, a town hall meetings happening across the country, this is what she reports -- of color that is a bit on what is happening in town hall meetings across the country. here on c-span we have been those town hall meetings and if you are interested in watching them, you can go to before we came up live here we were showing you a recent town hall meeting with congressman justin [indiscernible] a republican who many of you know is against the nsa program. nsa,
's daylong march on washington, celebrating 19630th anniversary of the march on washington. welcome to "washington journal" on the sunday, august 25, 2013. we will play you a couple of more comments from yesterday's speech. the question this morning, does new technology create better jobs? we will show you the opinion piece that is prompting our question. here are a couple of ways to participate in the discussion, as usual. by phone -- make sure you mute your television or radio when you call in. you can reach us on twitter or facebook. or send us an e-mail, the e-mail address is -- or send us an e-mail, the address is the front page this morning of t,"e washington pos the headline -- part of the reporting this morning area did president obama will be speaking on the actual anniversary day at the lincoln memorial. that is coming up on wednesday. here's the front page of the new york times and their front page photo from the march yesterday -- e froml play you mor that. comeshnology and jobs, it in an opinion peas from "the new york times," wri
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